"Scars have the strange power to remind us that our past is real."

Cormac McCarthy

Last updated 4 October  2019  © Julia Edwards

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When people talk about Georgian England, they're talking about the period from 1714 to 1830. George I came to the throne in 1714, and George IV died in 1830, with two other kings called George in between. The one who was on the throne when Slaves for the Isabella is set was George III, so you'll find a little bit about him on these pages. 

Georgians, famous, George, III, William, Wilberforce, Olaudah, Equiano, Thomas, Clarkson, Josiah, Wedgewood, Thomas, Daniel, abolition, slave, trade, campaign, Gustavus, Vassa, medallion, man, brother

I've started with William Wilberforce, even though Joe's dad complains that he's the only abolitionist people remember, because he is the most famous! You'll also find Olaudah Equiano, because Joe's dad is right that we need to remember the Black campaigners, Thomas Clarkson, who had a very interesting box which probably changed a lot of people's minds, Josiah Wedgwood, remembered these days for his china, but also a strong influence on public opinion against the Slave Trade, and Thomas Daniel, nicknamed the 'King of Bristol', probably Bristol's richest and most powerful slaver.

I realise that this adds up to 4 abolitionists to only 1 slave owner, which is exactly the kind of distortion that Joe's dad grumbles about in the book. The trouble is, the abolitionists stand out in history for their struggle to change the world, whereas slave owners at that time were two a penny! 

Since so much of Slaves for the Isabella is about the Slave Trade, I've otherwise chosen people famous for their association with the Trade or its abolition.