"Scars have the strange power to remind us that our past is real."

Cormac McCarthy

Last updated 4 October  2019  © Julia Edwards

  • Facebook Classic

Here are a few links to Tudor websites that you might find interesting:

Kentwell Hall: this Tudor hall in Suffolk is where I went to finish my research into daily life in Tudor times. They have lots of events throughout the year with real-life Tudors who are fantastically knowledgeable about the period. I loved it!

 

If you've read the page about the Mary Rose on here and you'd like to find out more, you can see what remains of the ship, her crew, and their possessions in the snazzy, purpose-built Mary Rose Museum in Portsmouth.

 

Tudor homework helper for kids: a good place to look for help if you're studying Tudors at school.

 

BBC Bitesize Tudors: this one has some fun video clips of famous Tudors talking about themselves and acting out snippets of their lives!

 

English Heritage owns a whole host of medieval and Tudor buildings. You'll find lots of information here about places to visit. The castle in "The Falconer's Quarry", Old Wardour Castle, is also one of English Heritage's properties. As Joe discovers, it's not a Tudor building, having been built in the 14th century. But I was so bowled over by it when I first visited that I knew immediately that I had to set one of my books there. If you enjoyed "The Falconer's Quarry", you just have to go!

Henry VIII, apparently alive and well, spotted at Chalke Valley in 2015.

The National Trust is the other major owner of Tudor buildings. This article from their website has a full list of places you might like to visit.

 

Tudors might not be central to the Key Stage 2 curriculum this week, but if you're a teacher hoping to find time to introduce your class to them and looking for resources (other than mine, which are on the schools page), help is at hand for you on the Teaching Ideas website.